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HERE
Ver video en Espanol Next Event: Saturday May 14th, 2016 11:00 am - 3:00 pm
Bell Street Park at 550 Bell Street East Palo Alto, CA

What is Reading Bonanza?

Who We Are

Description A free fun family literacy event, open to the public, held at a local park, involving reading activities, games, giveaways, raffles & entertainment
Exposing families to different books, community resources, and reading for entertainment, education, empowerment. Not only will families be exposed to a wealth of resources on that one day, but they will be able to take advantage of the programs each participating organization offers for the summer and beyond.  Reading Bonanza in the Park™ is a grass roots effort of volunteers and community organization representatives seeking to provide a BIG IMPACT event that will have a ripple effect in attacking the problem of low reading levels in low income communities. Much research and practical knowledge has been gathered to understand the factors affecting low reading levels in low income neighborhoods. The first Reading Bonanza in the Park, East Palo Alto On May 14th, 2011 Live the Dream Foundation of Silicon Valley & Stanford Alumni-Beyond the Farm hosted the first Reading Bonanza in the Park at Bell Street Park in East Palo Alto. This event was created by Marlayna Tuiasosopo who grew in Hayward,CA as a low income, disadvantaged youth. Her mother often took her to the Hayward Public Library as a young child. She attributes her academic and professional success to being able to read at a young age. She graduated from Stanford University with a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering, a master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from USC and currently works as an RF Applications Engineer for an international wireless communications company.

Why this event?

Two-thirds of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of fourth grade will end up in jail or on welfare (1. www.begintoread.com, 2015) "The link between academic failure and delinquency, violence, and crime is welded to reading failure." Over 70% of inmates in America's prisons cannot read above a fourth grade level. (2. U.S. Department of Justice) Children from low-income families are at greater risk for entering school unprepared. Economically disadvantaged children may know only one or two letters of the alphabet when entering kindergarten, while children in the middle class will know all 26. (3.U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) In middle-income neighborhoods the ratio of books per child is 13 to 1, in low-income neighborhoods, the ratio is 1 age-appropriate book for every 300 children. (4.Neuman, Susan B. and David K. Dickinson, 2006) 61 percent of low-income families have no books at all in their homes for their children. (5.Reading Literacy in the United States, 1996) Urging young people to read more when there is little available to read makes as much sense as urging starving people to eat, when no food is available. (6.Krashen, 2007) Out-of-school reading habits of students has shown that even 15 minutes a day of independent reading can expose students to more than a million words of text in a year. (7.Anderson, Wilson, & Fielding, 1988) Children who struggle in vain with reading in the first grade soon decide that they neither like nor want to read. (8.Juel, 1998) Research has shown that “creating a steady stream of new, age-appropriate books has been shown to nearly triple interest in reading within months.” (9.Harris, Louis. 2003) The only behavior measure that correlates significantly with reading scores is the number of books in the home. (10.The Literacy Crisis, 1998) A single, brief exposure to good reading material can result in a clear increase in enthusiasm for reading. (11.Ramos and Krashen, 1998; Cho and Krashen, 2002)

2015 Sponsors

Computers For Everyone - Stanford Beyond the Farm - East Palo Alto San Mateo - San Mateo County Human Services Agency - Alston & Bird LLC - Kepler's Books/Peninsula Arts & Letters - College Track – Facebook - Patent Law Works - 106 KMEL- StarVista - San Mateo Credit Union - Stanford Athletics - City of East Palo Alto - Midpen Media Center - San Mateo County Dept of Child Services - Second Harvest Food Bank - East Palo Alto Greyhounds - Ravenswood School District - Stanford Men’s Basketball - Lewis and Joan Platt East Palo Alto Family – YMCA - Share Literacy/Hoopoe Books - Ecumenical Hunger Program - Kohl's Cares - Reading Heart - First Book
Marlayna Tuiasosopo-Gordon
415-515-8843
tui3@stanfordalumni.org